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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
: so i'm responsible for our corporate strategy in north america, covering the united states and canada, and then looking at all of our corporate strategies across -- [inaudible] so overseeing all the different product areas and how we put together strategies there, that's my responsibility. >> host: you spent quite a few years in korea, correct? >> guest: that's right. just over ten years. >> host: and why are you now in the states? >> guest: probably they got tired of me, said we need a breather. but it's very interesting when you've been in the headquarters for a few years, you've seen what it is to have global responsibility but looking at narrower product lines. but now in coming to the u.s., i can look at all the different product lines in one geographic market, so it's a different way of looking at the business. much more in the trenches of day-to-day business in the market rather than in the headquarters of the corporation. >> host: for samsung's products is the u.s. and canada, north america, a growth market? >> guest: it still is. i mean, traditionally we've thought developed
for north america covering the united states and canada and looking at all the strategies so overseeing all the different products areas and how we put together strategies. >> host: you spend quite a few years in korea correct? >> guest: that's right. >> host: why are you now understates? >> guest: it's very interesting when you abandon the headquarters, you have seen what it is to have global responsibility when looking at a narrower product line but now i'm coming to the u.s. i can look at all the different product lines in one geographic context so it's a different way of looking at the business. more in the trenches of day to day business in the market rather than in in the headquarters of the corporation. >> host: or samsung products is the u.s. and canada north america a growth market? >> guest: >> guest: it still lives. traditionally we have developed markets and these developed markets are seen as somewhat mature but if you look at the last few years at our programs in the u.s. market we have seen tremendous growth. some of that is coming from new categories like the rise of digital
the u.s. and canada north america a growth market? >> it still is. traditionally we've thought about developed markets and developing markets. if you look at the last few years of our progress in the u.s. market, we've seen tremendous growth. some of that is coming from new categories like the rise of the digital television or the growth of the phone business. some of it is we pick up our market share in home appliances, an area where the samsung brand hasn't been as well known but bringing the same invasion we brought to television and phones, bringing the new design, now we can grab business in home appliances. >> what's the employment level in the us for samsung? >> we employ several thousands neem terms of sales and marketing and product design. we have a very large production center texas which is a semiconducter fab representing multibillion dollar investment for production. we so a fairly big footprint from coast to coast. >> david steel, one of your displace is tv's, smart tv, ultra hdtvs. >> lots of new technology. we are also devoting a big area to our home appliances recom
was in the americas. north america with both u.s. and canada, south america, but you look at the rest of the world. i would say other than europe and china, it has been an okay market. he looked at the middle east. you look dead parts of asia and greater asia-pacific. so it has been a good, broad spectrum of positive growth. liz: do you see any improvement? focus on europe. to you see any incremental growth there? >> i think our projections for the year are pretty flat. i think many positives that you will get in certain areas could be offset by further weakening. maybe even some of the, you know, whether it is a certain portion of france or germany, but in the u.k. is still suspect . no, i was going to call the flat and then held for the strategy, but there has to be hope. liz: be happy. something good happens, even though you say that china looks not as healthy as it has been in the past, you are striking some partnerships. you must be a believer. you will be doing a partnership involving mobile crane. would it be assembly? tell us about the relationship. >> we had a joint venture in track cranes c
america we can see clouds moving across the eastern u.s. and canada. underneath it's there's a lot going on. heavy snow showers and strong winds and drenching rain to the south. let me talk about this one. this system produced at least 15 tornadoes in the deep south on sunday. flooding rain will remain. winds are going to be problematic up to 130 kilometers. it's going to shift in towards the east and snow showers for the northwest on your tuesday. temperatures are not doing too badly in many locations but oklahoma city is going to be an exception. all ght. in east asia is new season has formed producing heavy rain and thunderstorms for taiwan as well as southern islands of japan. this system will head toward the east developing as it does. very cold air is coming in from the north producing lower temperatures across much of japan and precipitation. rain could change over to snow when it reaches central japan from wednesday night. tokyo we could be seeing snow showers from tonight. that will continue into yr wednesday. out towards the west looking dry across much of china which is good n
. >> the cardinals, there are three italians on that list and one from north america and one from canada and one from south america. and so you have the representation for around the globe. i think south america is in contention because you are talking about a center of catholicism. north america, offer him an opportunity to say look, we did something really different. they aren't going to pick an american, while america is a superpower. they aren't going to hand the nongovernmental institution to another american. so the chances are also good that this is the time they'll go back to an italian. you have three people that are put in high profile positions. one is dealing with issues of culture in the vatican. the other day, a conference about trying to reach out to youth and acknowledged that he played amy winehouse's cd to give an example of what young people are listening to. >> i'm sure we'll take advantage of them again. thank you. >> thank you. >>> for more on pope benedict's resignation and a photo gallery, log on to our website, wusa9.com. >>> there are shocking new details about the death o
the keystone x.l. pipeline from canada, that north america could potentially be energy independent, north american energy independence in the not-too-distant future. but let me just speak briefly, because i know the senator from louisiana is scheduled to be here as well, and this is a bipartisan effort, as all successful efforts around here must be. the keystone would create an estimated 20,000 american jobs in construction and manufacturing. in my state, which still is the number-one energy-producing state in the nation, and there is no coincidence here that job growth in texas is outpacing most of the rest of the country. i would add that north dakota is now the second largest energy producer in the country, thanks to the bakkan shale and the efforts there. the keystone would lead up to $1.16 billion of direct investment and would boost our state's economic output by an estimated $2 billion, leading -- creating not only thousands of long-lasting and well-paying jobs, it would allow texas refineries to refine up to 700 barrels of oil each day in our refineries, making that into gasoline,
. in north america, cold in the northeast as temperatures at or below freezing certainly for eastern parts of canada looking cold. towards the west, snow across the rockies, dry further south with highs of 21 in l.a. >> welcome back. here's a reminder of our main headlines on al-jazeera. at least 72 people are known to have died in an explosion at a vegetable market in southwestern pakistan in the city of quetta. at least 200 people were injured. afghanistan's president hamid karzai, says he will ban afghan security forces from calling in nato air support while in residential areas and thousands of protestors have gathered in tunisia's capital in support of the country's ruling ennahda party. rebel fighters in syria are claiming another victory near the city of aleppo, they say they've captured a government base near an international airport, improving their chances of capturing the city. here's our correspondent. >> syrian rebel fighters say they have captured a vital military installation, the 80th regiment air defense
the north american continent finally atlantic canada you'll see things taper off. heavier snow is targeting the heart of america. you can clearly see the defined comma. it's a weather pattern that dumped heavy snow amounts and caused the closing of school, cancellation of air flights, numerous power downs and traffic disturbances. take a look at these photos from kansas. the heavy snow has caused traffic disruption across kansas and the central plains. a state of emergency was declared on thursday. wichita had some 25 centimeters of snow in several hours which is the heaviest in 26 years. a lot of travel disturbances and accidents are occurring around the central plains. let's take aim to e great lakes region. additional snowfall could be as much as 30 centimeters and icy roads will dominate much of these regions. down toward the south another low pressure system will be creating severe weather. tornadic activity cannot be ruled out. temperatures are shaping up like this with wichita minus two. the averages around 8 degrees. a quick look here in europe. much of the northern half of the regi
. but there is opportunity for both countries to tackle climate change, the world a signal that north america is prepared to start looking at these issues. an openingleym, comment. >> i will start in a different place. i start with the depth and complexity of the relationship between canada and the u.s.. last year, the nobel prize committee awarded the peace prize to the european union, celebrating almost 70 years of peace. we are celebrating 200 years of peace against a long and porous border. we built a relationship. i am not sure i will buy into the analogy of marriage, open or otherwise. we are more like twins separated at birth in some ways. but our parents always liked us best. whether it is in the economy or energy and other resources, we are in this endeavor together. we share a point of view on almost every issue. the differences tend to be nuanced rather than deep or profound. there are a couple of rules of political life in canada. for the prime minister, one of his two important responsibilities is to manage the relationship with the united states. the other is to preserve national unity. whe
in north america by 2020. that is great for this neighborhood. >> what is the effect on the canada-u.s. relationship -- if the project is turned down? >> i don't think canadians will be impressed if the project is turned down. if it will do something to reduce greenhouse emissions in the united states, maybe you could make the argument. in terms of jobs estimates, we know 4,000 people today are working on the southern portion of the key xl project. so i will say more than 4000 will work on the upper portions. alberta has reduced its carbon intensity and emissions since 1990. industry is being driven to make improvements in technology in the way they use water and the way they get the oil out of the sand. it is not all about mining anymore. it's not enough, i am not apologizing for the carbon and tensity but you have to look accrued coming out of bakersfield, california. how does that relate to crude coming out of alberta? canadians would not be happy if the keystone is turned down, just as if it would not be happy if we have renewal will portfolio standards that do not recognize cl
western europe, stronger than latin america or canada. another quarter of a million will enter the catholic church this easter. seminaries in chicago, in maryland, at the north american college in rome are more full than they have been in 40 years, so there are real signs of vitality in the church in the united states. i think what we need to recognize, chris, is that this is a hinge moment in history. benedict xvi will be the last pope who attended the second vatican council, a significant theological adviser there. the next pope, whoever he is, will not have attended the second vatican council. so one era in the history of the catholic church and new era, which i describe in a book called evangelical catholicism, is about to open up. >>> people will be talking about it a lot in the coming hours and days, and the possibility of an american pope. the name that comes up, of course, is cardinal dolan here in new york. he is someone who has only been cardinal for less than a year. that would obviously argue against it. when i was talking to a mutual friend, his analysis was maybe
in north america by 2020 that is great. >> what is the effect on the canada u.s. relationship if the project is turned down? >> i don't think canadians would be impressed if it was turned down for the reasons discussed. if there reduce greenhouse gas emissions maybe you could make the argument but the fact matters in terms of job estimates we knew 4,000 people today are working on the project that is how many workers are employed i will say more than 4,000 will work on the upper portion also alberta has reduced corvine intensity not as quickly or as much but industry is being driven to make improvements the way they use water and get the oil out of the sand is not all about mining it is not enough progress am not apologizing for intensity but look out of -- look at crude coming out of california. canadians would not be happy just as if with renewable portfolio standards that don't recognize calling canadian hydro. keystone is the first option in a free-market society to get crude but that is not the only option. there are at least two pipelines to the west, one in west and eas
in america. >> that's right. you know, we can be north american energy independent. let's utilize our friends in canada and mexico. let's use our resources to be competitive with the rest of the world. stuart: why doesn't he just jump at it and create jobs, energy independence, very very quickly, real jobs no cost to the government or the taxpayer? why do you think he's not doing it? >> there's no good reason not to do it. that's why it is bipartisan. stuart: are the environmentalists that powerful? >> they are pretty strong, without question, they made a point that they did not want this thing done. they are going to have another protest in another week or two in washington as well. but it's, you know, this thing has been bipartisan, yes, senator kerry voted against it when he was a senator from massachusetts. he's in a different position now. let's hope he makes the right decision and says okay, we're ready for this after four and a half years. stuart: i have to leave it with the subject but i will leave it with you being somewhat skeptical that the president will approve keystone? >> i'd l
of north america, which we talked about, can actually work effectively together. with all the issues on a crowded agenda, i am pleased to be able to say that canada and the united states stand shoulder to shoulder and work together as partners, as allies, and as trusted friends. and i look forward to our cooperation, mr. baird. thank you for making me your first visit today. i appreciate it, and i look forward to discovering innovative new ways in which we can do even more and do better. thank you. >> thank you. thank you very much, mr. secretary, a great privilege and honor to be your first foreign minister to visit you here at the state department. thank you for the priority and the confidence you place in the relationship with canada. that is tremendously important. the united states has been phenomenal friend, and i think that leaders in the governments have accomplished a great deal. obviously for us, the number one priority continues to be job creation, economic growth, and i appreciate the opportunity to talk about a wide range of issues that we seek to tackle, to help encoura
, the world a signal that north america is prepared to start looking at these issues. >> john manley, an opening comment. >> i will start in a different place. i start with the depth and complexity of the relationship between canada and the u.s.. last year, the nobel prize committee awarded the peace prize to the european union, celebrating almost 70 years of peace. we are celebrating 200 years of peace against a long and porous border. we built a relationship. i am not sure i will buy into the analogy of marriage, open or otherwise. we are more like twins separated at birth in some ways. but our parents always liked us best. whether it is in the economy or energy and other resources, we are in this endeavor together. we share a point of view on almost every issue. the differences tend to be nuanced rather than deep or profound. there are a couple of rules of political life in canada. for the prime minister, one of his two important responsibilities is to manage the relationship with the united states. the other is to preserve national unity. when you look at that, there are two rule
canada's response for the 9/11 attacks and chaired the independent task force on the future of north america. and david humphrey is with the national security program at the center for strategic and international studies here in washington. he's a former senior official at the u.s. energy department and was involved in negotiations for the u.s.-canada free trade agreement and the north american free trade agreement. and luiza savages the bureau chief claims and the political editor at mclean. so in a moment on our conversation begins and we will hear from our guests on the stage. we will also hear from our studio audience a little later but first let's take the first five minutes and bring a little context to the conversation. >> on almost every level, the u.s.-canada relationship occasionally buffeted by the oddest form is the envy of the world. integrated industries and economies, the world's largest two-way trade mostly predictable allies and always dependable friends. but some major changes on the horizon could present new challenges for the relationship. let's begin with energy.
, the canadian. >> the prefect of the cardinal of bishops, cardinal willette. he's from the french part of canada. he spent time in missionary lands. he's done missionary work in south america. he has a european kind of feel and he's been in rome for a little while. he could potentially be the north american candidate, because he has european kind of roots. >> one negative, i heard the last time he addressed the assembled group, he put them to sleep. >> that's a negative. >> this type of discussion is fascinating. is it the type of discussion already going on amongst the cardinals or that will be going on the next several days? >> i think it is. you want someone intellectual, a linguist, who can speak in many languages but you want someone with a little of the carrism of john paul ii. >> absolutely. we want someone who can stand on a world stage and inspire people. >> what about conservative versus progressive. >> more than half of the cardinals, 67, currently were appointed by pope benedict. the other 50 who are voting were all appointed by pope john paul. there is a mold in some ways. we talk a
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)